Thursday, June 19, 2008

Daisy and the party

What is Daisy's opinion of Gatsby's party? How does this affect him?
What does Gatsby want from Daisy?

8 comments:

kristeena said...

Some dreams do come true but others only partly come true. On the night that Daisy finally comes to one of Gatsby's known parties he is awfully disappointed to notice she is not having fun. At the party Daisy seems to be very distasted with the events. This of course puts Gatsby down since in a way those parties had always been for Daisy. Gatsby had always thrown these parties in hope that maybe some day Daisy would waltz in. What Gatsby most wants is to impress Daisy, he wants her to want him. Gatsby actually believes that if he impresses Daisy enough he can win her over again; and that is what he wants most from Daisy, for her to love him again.

Young Eui Hong said...

I agree 100% with Kristeena. All the parties were arranged solely for Daisy's satisfaction. However, seeing that Daisy does not enjoy the party, Gatsby is greatly affected. All the luxury is worth nothing because of Daisy does not like the party. What Gatsby wants from Daisy, is her love. In the past, Daisy had promised Gatsby that she would wait, but she got married with Tom instead. So, by impressing Daisy with his parties, Gatsby thought he could get Daisy back to him.

Min Jae said...

The parties Gatsby hosted had a purpose to show Daisy that he was not the man she knew before. Although it was a way to lure her to him it was also a way to get her to feel differently in terms of socially with Gatsby. But as the party seemed too much for Daisy and Gatsby knowing this apparently he is bummed to know that all he accomplished failed. To him he might have thought that because she disliked the party she thought less of Gatsby. Their "relationship" would depend on the way she saw him at that party. What he wanted was just an approval from Daisy regarding his position now, a rich powerful man.

hyunah said...

In Chapter VI when Daisy and Tom go to Gatsby’s party for the first time, Daisy doesn’t really seem to be enjoying the party. Gatsby notices this and it greatly affects him because he had been hosting all his parties all along for the hope that Daisy might appear at one of them. Although Daisy did show up, Gatsby was disappointed to know that Daisy seemed uninterested and displeased. What Gatsby wants is to have Daisy’s love. He wants to go back to the past so Daisy would leave Tom for him. Gatsby wants Daisy to go to Tom and say that she never loved Tom. Although Daisy’s opinion of Gatsby’s party was not great, Gatsby doesn’t seem to give up and tells Nick that he was going to fix everything just the way it was before so Daisy would come back to him.

Maria S. said...

Daisy doesn’t enjoy the party too much because it really isn’t her kind of crowd. All these people are rich celebrities who don’t have high classed ancestors. They are the “new” rich and act like a total mess at Gatsby’s party. This makes Daisy uncomfortable but she tries to act as if she is enjoying her time in front of Tom. Gatsby sees her reaction to party and is disappointed his plan failed yet he doesn’t give up.

Norberto said...

Gatsby’s unique parties were only to attract Daisy’s interest. He planned everything according to what Daisy could like, such as the fancy high status people, the noise of laughter, expensive food, and much more. All he asked for was for Daisy to arrive and have a good time. Gatsby’s true purpose was to regain Daisy and her love. When he saw her having a mediocre time at one of his parties he felt uncomfortable. This is because she could of thought of Gatsby as not that great anymore.

clara said...

Daisy was clearly not happy at Gatsby’s party. She was probably not used to the way the “new” rich “played.” Gatsby noticed this and was instantly dispirited by Daisy’s lack of enthusiasm. Gatsby always thought that his parties would somehow attract Daisy’s attention, which was why he always threw the parties; for Daisy’s acceptance. He always wanted Daisy to acknowledge his success, his wealth; which was why he always flaunted his money around.

ben said...

Fitzgerald essentially demonstrates that pure love is a result of simplicity. The close association between emotions and materialism is not a viable connection.